FTC Eyeing Privacy And Security Of Connected Cars – JD Supra (press release)

Acting Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairman Maureen K. Ohlhausen made it clear that she expects the FTC’s enforcement role in protecting privacy and security to encompass automated and connected vehicles. In her opening remarks at a June 28, 2017 workshop hosted by the FTC and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), she said the FTC will take action against manufacturers and service providers of autonomous and connected vehicles if their activities violate Section 5 of the FTC Act, which prohibits unfair and deceptive acts or practices.

Such concern is warranted as new technologies allow vehicles to not only access the Internet, but also to independently generate, store and transmit all types of data – some of which could be very valuable to law enforcement, insurance companies, and other industries. For example, such data can not only show a car’s precise location, but also whether it violated posted speed limits, and aggressively followed behind, or cut-off, other cars.

Acting Chairman Ohlhausen noted that the FTC wants to coordinate its regulatory efforts with NHTSA, and envisions that both organizations will have important roles, similar to the way the FTC and the Department of Health and Human Services both have roles with respect to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Traditionally, NHTSA has dealt with vehicle safety issues, as opposed to privacy and data security. Thus, it may mean that the FTC will have a key role on these issues as they apply to connected cars, as it already has been a major player on privacy and data security in other industries.

Acting Chairman Ohlhausen also encouraged Congress to consider data breach and data security legislation for these new industries, but speakers at the workshop (video available here) noted that legislation in this area will have difficulty keeping up with the fast pace of change of these technologies.

Specific federal legislation, or even laws at the state level, may be slow in coming given the many stakeholders who have an interest in the outcome. Until then, the broad mandate of Section 5 may be one of the main sources of enforcement. Companies who provide goods or services related to autonomous and connected vehicles should be familiar with the basic FTC security advice we have already blogged about here, and should work with knowledgeable attorneys as they pursue their design and manufacture plans.

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