Category Archives: Selfdriving

Morgan Stanley found 30 ways to invest in the big autonomous driving trend including Domino’s Pizza – CNBC

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There are more ways to trade the autonomous driving and electric car trends than you think.

Morgan Stanley shared its favorite 30 stock picks for the emerging technologies with clients that not only include the direct auto-related supplier winners, but consumer and retail names that may benefit from the freed up time and responsibilities.

The firm’s “US Research team settled on 30 US stocks, all rated either overweight or equal-weight, across 14 industries, that the analysts believe are favorably exposed to growth opportunities in the execution of a shared, autonomous, electric ecosystem, or are favorably positioned to the adjacent data and content opportunities,” analyst Adam Jonas wrote in a report to clients Thursday entitled “The Shared Autonomous 30.”

The analyst cited how cars are only utilized 4 percent of the time. In addition, there are approximately 3,500 traffic fatalities per day that could be reduced through autonomous driving.

Jonas is known for having some of the most aggressively bullish predictions on Tesla’s ambitions including a note highlighting
an Uber-like transport service with autonomous electric vehicles published last year.

“Shared and automated transport also unlocks the more than 600bn hours of driver and passenger time currently spent in vehicles (equal to 68 million years annually), by itself representing an economic opportunity for content and data worth potentially trillions of dollars,” he wrote.

Morgan Stanley even included consumer and retail companies Disney, Buffalo Wild Wings, Domino’s Pizza and Constellation Brands on its list as second-derivative autonomous driving plays.

Disney can profit from higher media consumption due to the more available free time, the report claims. While Buffalo Wild Wings and Constellation Brands could thrive because of higher alcohol sales as drivers do not have to worry about driving under the influence. And Domino’s Pizza can benefit from lower delivery costs, according to the firm.

For the more direct winners on autonomous driving, here are auto and transportation-related companies Morgan Stanley recommended and their price targets.

1) Magna (MGA)

“Magna-Steyr is in a singularly advantageous position to help new entrants who may want to ‘make’ their own cars by playing a similar role to what Foxconn does today for Apple in the smartphone industry,” the report said.

Morgan Stanley has an overweight rating on Magna with a $60 price target, representing 34 percent upside from Wednesday’s close.

2) Schneider National (SNDR)

The firm’s “rating reflects an improving truckload demand environment, structural supply tightening from ELDs [electronic logging devices], the secret sauce of the Quest system, technology leadership taking advantage of secular gains from intelligent trucks, and below-peer valuation,” the note said.

Morgan Stanley has an overweight rating on Schneider National with a $24 price target, representing 22 percent upside from Wednesday’s close.

3) Visteon (VC)

Visteon has the “highest forecast earnings growth of any supplier stock in our coverage … Cockpit electronics are largely powertrain agnostic and highly relevant in the new business model (shared/autonomous),” the firm wrote.

Morgan Stanley has an overweight rating on Visteon with a $115 price target, representing 15 percent upside from Wednesday’s close.

4) XPO Logistics (XPO)

“We are overweight XPO, which we see as the Tesla of Freight Transportation. We like XPO’s technology-driven platform strategy that is unique in the space,” the report said.

Morgan Stanley has a $60 price target for XPO Logistics, representing 13 percent upside from Wednesday’s close.

Nevada to Create First Statewide Vehicle-to-Vehicle Network – FenderBender

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Nevada to Create First Statewide Vehicle-to-Vehicle Network
FenderBender
May 25, 2017—The Nevada Center for Advanced Mobility (Nevada CAM) and Nexar have partnered to create the first statewide vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) network in the country. The collaboration is designed to enhance safety on Nevada’s roads and highways …

and more »

Nevada Plans To Launch Nation’s First Statewide V2V Network – Pipeline Magazine (press release)

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Nevada Plans To Launch Nation’s First Statewide V2V Network
Pipeline Magazine (press release)
Nexar’s V2V network, that has shown 24% reduction in collisions since its inception, uses smartphone dashcams and cellular technology to provide drivers real-time alerts to prevent vehicle, cyclist and pedestrian collisions. The network is well

and more »

What Self-Driving Cars See – New York Times

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The biggest hurdle to widespread lidar adoption is an economic one, and that is where the battle is being waged.

Photo

A lidar sensor from Luminar. The technology uses near-infrared light to detect the shape of objects around it.

Credit
Diana Rothery for Luminar Technologies

When Google initially started its autonomous vehicle research eight years ago, the lidar sensors it used cost roughly $75,000. Those sensors were made by Velodyne Lidar, an industry leader. Velodyne declined to say what the current pricing is for such systems, but Waymo’s chief executive, John Krafcik, said in a recent presentation that his company had reduced the cost of its lidar system by 90 percent.

But even at $7,500, such systems are seen as too expensive to meet automakers’ demands.

“Car companies want it to cost $100 and perform 10 times better, be smaller — and very reliable,” said Omer Keilaf, chief executive of Innoviz Technologies, a lidar developer based in Israel. “So there’s a big vacuum in the industry right now.”

The race to fill that void is largely focused on producing solid-state lidar systems, which would shrink the size of the sensors, eliminate moving parts involved in the optical mechanisms and enable the kind of mass manufacturing that could bring costs down, said Hongbo Zhang, a research associate at Virginia Tech who is working on a lidar design. Established automotive suppliers, such as Velodyne and Valeo; technology companies like Waymo and Uber; and relative newcomers like Innoviz, LeddarTech and Quanergy all have their sights set on making less expensive sensors.

Solid-state lidars tend to have a reduced field of view, about 120 degrees compared with the 360-degree view offered by rooftop models. “So to create a cocoon around the car, you need to integrate four to six solid-state lidar sensors,” said Marc A. Morin, a spokesman for LeddarTech.

But most of the researchers working on these designs still believe they can produce them for much lower prices, and Hyundai has demonstrated in its Ioniq autonomous test cars how such sensors could be made less conspicuous and concealed in the bumpers and roof pillars of vehicles.

Luminar Technologies, a lidar company that recently came out of stealth mode, is focusing on improving the performance of sensors by extending the effective range of lidar past 200 meters. (Top-of-the-line sensors now have a range of 120 meters.) Austin Russell, Luminar’s chief executive, said the company accomplished the longer range by using a more sensitive receiver, as well as a more powerful light output that remains safe enough to avoid damaging people’s vision.

Graphic

The Race for Self-Driving Cars

There are increasing signs that autonomous cars have arrived — and may be driving on our city streets sooner than we think.

Velodyne, which says it is the only current third-party lidar supplier for fully autonomous vehicles now being tested, is well aware that start-ups are gunning for its business. Velodyne is working on its own solid-state Velarray lidar sensor, said Mike Jellen, Velodyne president, and it plans to start mass-producing them next year in a 200,000-square-foot factory in San Jose, Calif.

While there has been considerable speculation about how Velodyne will face the potential price competition, Mr. Jellen declined to estimate how much the new sensors might cost, saying only that a complete lidar sensor package for future vehicles might be priced in the “low thousands” per vehicle.

Other companies building complete autonomous driving packages expect prices to fall faster.

“In five years, for ride-sharing cars, it could be an $8,000” option, said Jeffrey Owens, chief technology officer for Delphi. Delphi recently announced it was working with Intel, BMW and Mobileye on an autonomous driving platform. “In 2025, it could be $5,000,” he said.

“The problem is that we’re still in A.I. learning mode and only buying in quantities of a couple thousand,” said Velodyne’s Jellen, referring to artificial intelligence. “The problem is, the market isn’t there yet.”

There are also some technical kinks that need to be ironed out with new systems. Different versions of lidar paint images of the world around them in different ways, said Mr. Zhang at Virginia Tech. That means different lidar sensors from different companies cannot simply be exchanged for one another on an autonomous BMW or Ford vehicle. How a car is trained and learns will partly depend on the specific type of lidar used.

In spite of these challenges, Mr. Keilaf of Innoviz and many others say there will not be fully autonomous cars without lidar — and it will have to be cheap.

It will also have to meet exceptionally high standards.

“An autonomous vehicle that’s 99 percent safe won’t be good enough,” said Mr. Russell of Luminar. “This is mission critical. You can’t afford to miss a single object because that object could be a person.”

Continue reading the main story

Nevada Initiative Aims to Improve Road Safety and Reduce Collisions – FenderBender

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Nevada Initiative Aims to Improve Road Safety and Reduce Collisions
FenderBender
May 25, 2017—The Nevada Center for Advanced Mobility (Nevada CAM) and Nexar have partnered to create the first statewide vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) network in the country. The collaboration is designed to enhance safety on Nevada’s roads and highways …

Baidu Makes a Bold Move in the Self-Driving-Car Market – Madison.com

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Autonomous driving is all the rage lately, and it seems that every large technology company is developing its own autonomous vehicles or partnering with a company that is. The race here isn’t necessarily about who can perfect the technology first, although that is certainly a consideration. The race is on for the title of industry standard in the space.

The early front-runner is the Waymo division of Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG), which has been working to develop the technology since 2009, much longer than any other player in the emerging field. The company has developed integrated hardware and software systems that other players lack.

Understandably, companies have been reluctant to share this intellectual property, and numerous lawsuits have erupted involving stolen trade secrets and employee poaching.

Baidu surprises with a move to open-source its self-driving-car technology. Image source: Baidu.

The road less traveled

That’s why it came as such a surprise last month, when Baidu, Inc. (NASDAQ: BIDU), the Chinese search leader and early contender for that country’s artificial-intelligence crown, announced that it would open-source its autonomous driving technology. The company revealed that it was in discussions with several automakers in the U.S., China, and Germany to collaborate on self-driving cars, though it declined to identify those companies. According to the plan, Baidu wil begin a three-year process in July for gradually sharing its technology on the project, titled “Apollo” after the U.S. lunar-landing program. Baidu’s president and chief operating officer, Qi Lu, said:

China is the world’s largest market for automotive sales and production. It has many car brands and an open environment that is ripe for collaboration. Baidu took the initiative to open our autonomous-driving technology to the industry in order to encourage greater innovation and opportunities, making better use of our technology to drive the evolution of the entire industry.

Many consider Baidu to be the leader in autonomous driving in its native China, and it believes that this strategy is particularly well suited to its home market, where automakers don’t necessarily have the resources to develop their own self-driving cars. By taking this route, Baidu hopes it can help reduce the redundancy that’s occurring in autonomous-driving research and believes the rewards would come in the form of the data collected. Baidu also possesses extensive mapping data of China, which outsiders lack.

Both hands on the wheel

The decision may have been inspired by the strategy Google employed to dominate the smartphone market with its Android operating system. Electric-car maker Tesla, Inc. had also chosen to release its intellectual property to accelerate development in the field of electric vehicles. Baidu plans to gradually release its autonomous-vehicle technology over three years beginning in July.

This announcement by the search giant comes on the heels of a revelation that hackers had targeted Baidu’s driverless-car technology, causing the company to increase its cybersecurity team. The company declined to reveal whether these events had any bearing on its open-sourcing decision. 

NVIDIA partnered with Baidu on create a cloud-to-car self-driving platform. Image source: NVIDIA.

Riding shotgun

Even in the U.S. market, many have sought partnerships as the path to success. Earlier this month, NVIDIA Corporation (NASDAQ: NVDA) announced at its annual GPU Technology Conference that it was collaborating with Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE: TM) on autonomous-driving systems. Toyota had chosen to use the NVIDIA DRIVE PX self-driving platform to process the massive amount of sensor data collected, and the engineers of both companies would work to develop software for the venture. NVIDIA and Baidu had previously announced a partnership to create a cloud-to-car self-driving platform, which would combine Baidu’s mapping technology and cloud platform with NVIDIA’s DRIVE PX 2 self-driving in-car supercomputer to provide an end-to-end solution.

NVIDIA has previously declared numerous partnerships in its quest to ensure that its technology remains in the driver’s seat of autonomous cars. The company is working with several automakers, including German luxury-car maker Audi and Daimler AG unit Mercedes-Benz. NVIDIA is also working with Bosch, the world’s largest automotive supplier, to create an AI supercomputer for highly autonomous vehicles.

It’s a long road

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Boston Consulting Group estimates that by 2035, 12 million fully autonomous and 18 million partially vehicles will be sold globally every year, and the market will grow from $42 billion in 2025 to $77 billion by 2035.

As fully autonomous vehicles move from the realm of science fiction to reality, there is no one-size-fits-all solution, at least not at this point. The market will probably be large enough to accommodate multiple players. Still, each company hopes that its technology will be crowned the industry standard and benefit from the data that will the crown jewel of those efforts. Baidu believes that by open-sourcing its technology, it will get the jump on the competition. Only time will tell.

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Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Danny Vena owns shares of Alphabet (A shares), Baidu, and Tesla. Danny Vena has the following options: long January 2018 $640 calls on Alphabet (C shares) and short January 2018 $650 calls on Alphabet (C shares). The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Baidu, Nvidia, and Tesla. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Baidu Makes a Bold Move in the Self-Driving-Car Market – Motley Fool

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Autonomous driving is all the rage lately, and it seems that every large technology company is developing its own autonomous vehicles or partnering with a company that is. The race here isn’t necessarily about who can perfect the technology first, although that is certainly a consideration. The race is on for the title of industry standard in the space.

The early front-runner is the Waymo division of Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOGL) (NASDAQ:GOOG), which has been working to develop the technology since 2009, much longer than any other player in the emerging field. The company has developed integrated hardware and software systems that other players lack.

Understandably, companies have been reluctant to share this intellectual property, and numerous lawsuits have erupted involving stolen trade secrets and employee poaching.

A fleet of self-driving cars topped with sensors.

Baidu surprises with a move to open-source its self-driving-car technology. Image source: Baidu.

The road less traveled

That’s why it came as such a surprise last month, when Baidu, Inc. (NASDAQ:BIDU), the Chinese search leader and early contender for that country’s artificial-intelligence crown, announced that it would open-source its autonomous driving technology. The company revealed that it was in discussions with several automakers in the U.S., China, and Germany to collaborate on self-driving cars, though it declined to identify those companies. According to the plan, Baidu wil begin a three-year process in July for gradually sharing its technology on the project, titled “Apollo” after the U.S. lunar-landing program. Baidu’s president and chief operating officer, Qi Lu, said:

China is the world’s largest market for automotive sales and production. It has many car brands and an open environment that is ripe for collaboration. Baidu took the initiative to open our autonomous-driving technology to the industry in order to encourage greater innovation and opportunities, making better use of our technology to drive the evolution of the entire industry.

Many consider Baidu to be the leader in autonomous driving in its native China, and it believes that this strategy is particularly well suited to its home market, where automakers don’t necessarily have the resources to develop their own self-driving cars. By taking this route, Baidu hopes it can help reduce the redundancy that’s occurring in autonomous-driving research and believes the rewards would come in the form of the data collected. Baidu also possesses extensive mapping data of China, which outsiders lack.

Both hands on the wheel

The decision may have been inspired by the strategy Google employed to dominate the smartphone market with its Android operating system. Electric-car maker Tesla, Inc. had also chosen to release its intellectual property to accelerate development in the field of electric vehicles. Baidu plans to gradually release its autonomous-vehicle technology over three years beginning in July.

This announcement by the search giant comes on the heels of a revelation that hackers had targeted Baidu’s driverless-car technology, causing the company to increase its cybersecurity team. The company declined to reveal whether these events had any bearing on its open-sourcing decision. 

A self-driving car sensing pedestrians and other vehicles along the roadway.

NVIDIA partnered with Baidu on create a cloud-to-car self-driving platform. Image source: NVIDIA.

Riding shotgun

Even in the U.S. market, many have sought partnerships as the path to success. Earlier this month, NVIDIA Corporation (NASDAQ:NVDA) announced at its annual GPU Technology Conference that it was collaborating with Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) on autonomous-driving systems. Toyota had chosen to use the NVIDIA DRIVE PX self-driving platform to process the massive amount of sensor data collected, and the engineers of both companies would work to develop software for the venture. NVIDIA and Baidu had previously announced a partnership to create a cloud-to-car self-driving platform, which would combine Baidu’s mapping technology and cloud platform with NVIDIA’s DRIVE PX 2 self-driving in-car supercomputer to provide an end-to-end solution.

NVIDIA has previously declared numerous partnerships in its quest to ensure that its technology remains in the driver’s seat of autonomous cars. The company is working with several automakers, including German luxury-car maker Audi and Daimler AG unit Mercedes-Benz. NVIDIA is also working with Bosch, the world’s largest automotive supplier, to create an AI supercomputer for highly autonomous vehicles.

It’s a long road

Boston Consulting Group estimates that by 2035, 12 million fully autonomous and 18 million partially vehicles will be sold globally every year, and the market will grow from $42 billion in 2025 to $77 billion by 2035.

As fully autonomous vehicles move from the realm of science fiction to reality, there is no one-size-fits-all solution, at least not at this point. The market will probably be large enough to accommodate multiple players. Still, each company hopes that its technology will be crowned the industry standard and benefit from the data that will the crown jewel of those efforts. Baidu believes that by open-sourcing its technology, it will get the jump on the competition. Only time will tell.


Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Danny Vena owns shares of Alphabet (A shares), Baidu, and Tesla. Danny Vena has the following options: long January 2018 $640 calls on Alphabet (C shares) and short January 2018 $650 calls on Alphabet (C shares). The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Baidu, Nvidia, and Tesla. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.